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Safeguarding Policy

The Northern Academy of Performing Arts Educational Trust
Safeguarding of Children and Adults at Risk Policy

Policy Title Safeguarding of Children & Adults at Risk Policy
Status Adopted July 2018
Review Date October 2019
Lead Area NBe

 

  • Contents
  • Policy Statement
  • Annexe 1 – Designated Staff with Responsibility for Safeguarding
  • Annexe 2 – Procedures for Dealing with the Disclosure of Abuse and Reporting Concerns
  • Annexe 3 – Procedures for Reporting and Dealing with Allegations of Abuse against Students and Members of Staff
    Annexe 4 – Recruitment and Selection Procedures, Staff and Students
  • Annexe 5 – Guidelines for the Appointment of NAPA Contractors
  • Annexe 6 – Briefing notes for staff consultation and information

October 2019

Policy Statement

The Northern Academy of Performing Arts Educational Trust (NAPA) has a statutory, ethical and moral duty to ensure that NAPA functions with a view to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children, young people and adults at risk who are enrolled on courses or are visiting NAPA. Safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility.

Throughout this document, reference is made to ‘children and young people’. This term is used to mean ‘those under the age of 18’. This policy also refers to adults who are vulnerable to abuse. This term is used to mean “a person aged 18 or over who has a condition of the following type (a more detailed description is available in the Vulnerable Groups Act 2006):

  1. a substantial learning or physical disability
  2. a physical or mental illness or mental disorder, chronic or otherwise, including an addiction to alcohol or drugs; or
  3. a significant reduction in physical or mental capacity

The Board of Trustees and the management are committed to ensuring that NAPA:

  • Provides a safe environment for children, young people and adults at risk to study and live in and those children, young people and adults at risk are safe and feel safe.
  • Identifies children, young people and adults at risk who are suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm.
  • Takes appropriate action to see that such children, young people and adults at risk are kept safe, both at the NAPA and at home.

In pursuit of these aims, the Board of Trustees will approve and annually review policies and procedures with the aim of:

  • Raising awareness of issues relating to the welfare of children, young people and adults at risk and the promotion of a safe environment for them whilst they are at NAPA.
  • Aiding the identification of children, young people and adults at risk who are at risk of significant harm, and providing procedures for reporting concerns and acting on these.
  • Establishing procedures for reporting and dealing with allegations of abuse against members of staff and fellow students.
  • The safe recruitment of staff and students.

In developing their policies and procedures, the Board of Trustees will consult with, and take account of relevant guidance and good practice, including liaison with the Charity Commission and other appropriate agencies.

The Board of Trustees will refer concerns that a child, young person or adults at risk might be at risk of significant harm to Children’s Social Services / the appropriate agencies as agreed with the Local Safeguarding Board. (LSB)

The CEO and all staff working with children will receive training adequate to familiarise them with Safeguarding issues and procedures and policies, with refresher training at least every 3 every years. The CEO (Carl Wheatley) will have special responsibility for Safeguarding issues (the designated senior member of staff with lead responsibility for child protection and the protection of adults at risk). He shall be assisted by Katie Wright who is a member of the senior leadership team at NAPA.

NAPA recognises the following as definitions of abuse:

Physical Abuse
Physical abuse causes harm to a child, adult at risk or young person’s person. It may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning, scalding, drowning or suffocating. It may be done deliberately or recklessly or be the result of a deliberate failure to prevent injury occurring.

Neglect
Neglect is the persistent or severe failure to meet a child, adults at risk or young person’s basic physical and/or psychological needs. It will result in serious impairment of the child or young person’s health or development. Neglect may occur when a child’s medical or dental needs are not addressed (e.g. failure to attend hospital when injuries occur or medication is ignored)

Sexual Abuse
Sexual abuse involves a child, adults at risk or young person being forced or coerced into participating in or watching sexual activity, looking at or being involved in the production of pornographic materials or encouraging them to behave in sexually inappropriate ways. It is not necessary for a child, or young person to be aware that the activity is sexual and the apparent consent of the child, adults at risk or young person is irrelevant.

Emotional Abuse
Emotional abuse occurs where there is persistent emotional ill treatment or rejection. It causes severe and adverse effects on the child, adults at risk or young person’s behaviour and emotional condition, resulting in low self worth. Some level of emotional abuse is present in all forms of abuse.

Financial Abuse
Financial abuse occurs when money is unreasonably denied to someone who is financially dependant, money is stolen or misused or information is withheld about welfare benefits.

Annexe 1      Designated Staff with Responsibility for Safeguarding

Senior Staff Member with Lead Responsibility

The designated senior member of staff with lead responsibility for Safeguarding children & adults at risk is the CEO, Carl Wheatley.  He has a key duty to take lead responsibility for raising awareness within the NAPA of issues relating to the welfare of children, young people and adults at risk, and the promotion of a safe environment within the NAPA.

He has received training in child and adults at risk protection issues and inter-agency working, as required by the Safeguarding Board and will receive refresher training at least every 2 years.

The CEO is responsible for ensuring that the following takes place:

  • Oversight of the referral of cases of suspected abuse or allegations to the relevant investigating agencies as agreed with Hull Children’s Safeguarding Board
  • Ensuring that systems operate within NAPA which enable all staff and contractors engaged on official NAPA business, to be able to respond appropriately when challenged as to their right to enter all areas of the premises.
  • Provision of advice and support to staff and students on issues relating to the protection of children, young people and adults at risk
  • Maintaining a proper record of any child or adults at risk protection referral, complaint or concern (even where that concern does not lead to a formal referral)
  • Ensuring that parents of children and young people within NAPA are aware of the NAPA’s Safeguarding policy.
  • Liaison with the LSB, Charity Commission and other appropriate agencies.
  • Liaison with organisations who send children or adults at risk to NAPA premises so as to ensure that appropriate arrangements are made for their protection.
  • Liaison with schools, employers and training organisations that receive children, young people or adults at risk from NAPA (such as for specific events) to ensure that appropriate safeguards are put in place prior to the arrangement taking place.
  • Ensuring that all staff and where possible, Trustees, receive training in safeguarding issues and are aware of NAPA’S Safeguarding policies and procedures.
  • Ensuring that appropriate safeguards are in place for the management of visitors and contractors on NAPA’s premises.
  • Ensuring that recruitment and selection policies for staff, trustees and admissions policies for students are regularly reviewed and adhered to including enhanced DBS disclosures.

The designated senior member of staff will provide a verbal update report to the Board of Trustees at each of their meetings, outlining how NAPA has discharged its duties. He/she is responsible for reporting deficiencies in procedure or policy identified by the LSB (or others) to the Board of Trustees at the earliest possible opportunity.

Designated Staff Members

Designated members of staff with responsibility for Safeguarding issues are:

  • Carl Wheatley – CEO – Telephone: 01482 310690
  • Katie Wright – Head of Education and Engagement – Telephone: 01482 310690

They will report to the Board of Trustees on Safeguarding issues, ensure that Safer Recruitment procedures are followed on the appointment of all staff and volunteers and a central record of checks is maintained. They will ensure no trustee, member of staff, paid or voluntary, takes responsibility at NAPA unless all enhanced DBS procedures are complete and satisfactory.

They will know how to make an appropriate referral to Children’s Services (Hull or East Riding if a child lives in that area) and will be available to provide advice and support to other staff and students on issues relating to the protection of children and adults at risk.

They have a particular responsibility to be available to listen to children, young people and adults at risk studying at NAPA and will deal with individual cases, including setting up and/or attending case conferences and review meetings as appropriate.

They will have received training in Safeguarding issues and inter-agency working, as required by the LSB, and will receive refresher training at least every 2 years.

Designated Trustee

The designated member of the Board of Trustees with responsibility for Safeguarding issues is Naomi Bedworth.

The designated Trustee is responsible for liaising with the CEO over matters regarding the protection of children and adults at risk, including:

  • Ensuring that the NAPA has procedures and policies which are consistent with the LSB’s procedures
  • Ensuring that the Board of Trustees considers the NAPA’s Policy on safeguarding each year
  • Ensuring that the Board of Trustees is informed annually of how NAPA and its staff have complied with the policy, including but not limited to a report on the training that staff have undertaken.

The designated Trustee is responsible for overseeing the liaison between agencies such as the Police and Social Services – as defined by the LSB, in the event of any allegations made against the CEO.

Annexe 2 Procedures for Dealing with the Disclosure of Abuse and Reporting Concerns

If a child, young person or adults at risk tells a member of staff about possible abuse:

  • Listen carefully and stay calm.
  • Do not interview the child, young person or adults at risk, but question normally and without pressure, in order to be sure that you understand what the person is telling you. It is important not to ask leading questions.
  • Do not put words into the person’s mouth.
  • Reassure the person that by telling you, they have done the right thing and try to ensure immediate safety.
  • Inform the person that you must pass the information on, but that only those that need to know about it will be told. Inform them of to whom you will report the matter and do not offer confidentiality.
  • Note the main points carefully for your detailed record. The information is kept in a file locked away in the CEO’s office
  • Make a detailed note of the date, time, place, what the child, young person or adults at risk said, did and your questions etc.

Staff should not investigate concerns or allegations themselves, but should report them immediately to the CEO/designated staff member, as detailed in Annexe 1.

Annexe 3 Procedures for Reporting and Dealing with Allegations of Abuse against Students and Members of Staff

These procedures apply to all staff, whether academic, administrative, management or support, as well as to any volunteers working at NAPA. The word “staff” is used for ease of description. These procedures also refer to all enrolled students. Where students are also employed by NAPA, the procedures relating to staff should be followed.

3.1 Allegations against members of staff

Because of their frequent contact with children, young people and adults at risk, staff may have allegations of abuse made against them. NAPA recognises that an allegation of abuse made against a member of staff may be made for a variety of reasons and that the facts of the allegation may or may not be true. It is imperative that those dealing with an allegation maintain an open mind and investigations are thorough and not subject to delay.

NAPA recognises that the Children Act 1989 states that the welfare of the child or young person is the paramount concern. It is also recognised that hasty or ill-informed decisions in connection with a member of staff can irreparably damage an individual’s reputation, confidence and career. Therefore, those dealing with such allegations within NAPA will do so with sensitivity and will act in a careful, measured way.

Receiving an Allegation

A member of staff who receives an allegation about another member of staff from a member of staff, a student or a child, young person or adults at risk should follow the guidelines in Annexe 2 for dealing with disclosure. The allegation should be reported immediately to the CEO. They will obtain written details of the allegation from the person who received it, and ensure the statement is signed and dated. Where possible information about times, dates, locations and names of and potential witnesses should also be recorded.

Initial Assessment

The CEO will make an initial assessment of the allegation, consulting with colleagues and the LSB as appropriate. Where the allegation is considered to be either a potential criminal act or indicates that the child, young person or adults at risk has suffered, is suffering or is likely to suffer significant harm, the matter should be reported immediately to the LSB. This is a 24 hour responsibility.

It is important that the CEO does not investigate the allegation. The initial assessment should be on the basis of the information received and is a decision about whether or not the allegation warrants further investigation.

Where the matter does not require reporting to the local LSB, other potential outcomes are:

  1. The allegation can be addressed in accordance with NAPA’s Staff Disciplinary Procedures.
  2. The allegation can be shown to be false because the facts alleged could not possibly be true and no further action is required.

Enquiries and Investigations

Safeguarding enquiries by Social Services or the Police are not to be confused with internal, disciplinary enquiries by the NAPA. NAPA may be able to use the outcome of external agency enquiries as part of its own procedures. The statutory agencies, including the Police, have no power to direct NAPA to act in a particular way; however, it is expected that NAPA will always assist the agencies with their enquiries.

NAPA shall hold in abeyance its own internal enquiries while the formal police or social services investigations proceed; to do otherwise may prejudice the investigation. Any internal enquiries shall conform to the existing staff disciplinary procedures.

If there is an investigation by an external agency, for example the Police, the CEO would normally be involved in, and contribute to, the inter-agency strategy discussions. The CEO will be responsible for ensuring that NAPA provides every assistance required to the investigation. She/he will ensure that appropriate confidentiality is maintained in connection with the enquiries, in the interests of the member of staff about whom the allegation is made. NAPA’s CEO should advise the member of staff that he/she should consult with a representative, for example, a trade union and undertake a welfare role to be a contact when the subject of the investigation is procedurally suspended.

Subject to objections from the police or other investigating agency, The CEO should:

Inform the person making the allegation that the investigation is taking place and what the likely process will involve.

Ensure that the parents/carers of a child or young person making an allegation have been informed that the allegation has been made and what the likely process will involve. In certain circumstances it may be appropriate to inform the recorded next of kin of a adults at risk making an allegation.

This role will be undertaken with the guidance of the Local Authority Designated Officer who is based with the respective Safeguarding Boards

Inform the member of staff against whom the allegation was made of the fact that the investigation is taking place and what the likely process will involve. This role will be undertaken with the guidance of the Local Authority Designated Officer, who is based with the respective Safeguarding Boards

Inform the Board of Trustees of the allegation and the investigation.

The CEO shall keep a written record of the action taken in connection with the allegation and should consider, with the Chair of the Board of Trustees any action under NAPA’s staff disciplinary regulations which should be taken, pending the outcome of the full investigation, to safeguard both those who have made the allegation, any others who may potentially be at risk, and the member of staff concerned.

Allegations without foundation

False allegations may be indicative of problems of abuse elsewhere. A record should be kept and consideration given to a referral to the LSB in order that other agencies may act upon the information.

Records

It is important that documents relating to an investigation are retained in a secure place, together with a written record of the outcome and, if disciplinary action is taken, details retained on the member of staff’s personal and confidential file, in line with normal data protection procedures.

If a member of staff is dismissed or resigns before the disciplinary process is completed, he/she should be informed about NAPA’s statutory duty to inform the Secretary of State for Education under the “List 99” procedures.

Monitoring Effectiveness

Where an allegation has been made against a member of staff, The CEO should, at the conclusion of the investigation and any disciplinary procedures, consider whether there are any matters arising from it that could lead to the improvement of the NAPA’s procedures and/or policies and/or which should be drawn to the attention of the LSB.

3.2 Allegations against students

In some instances, students have been found to be responsible for the abuse of children, young people or adults at risk who may also be fellow students.

NAPA recognises that an allegation of abuse made against a student may be made for a variety of reasons and that the facts of the allegation may or may not be true. It is imperative that those dealing with an allegation maintain an open mind and investigations are thorough and not subject to delay.

NAPA recognises that the Children Act 1989 states that the welfare of the child or young person is the paramount concern. It is also recognised that hasty or ill-informed decisions in connection with a student can irreparably damage an individual’s reputation, confidence and career. Therefore, those dealing with such allegations within NAPA will do so with sensitivity and will act in a careful, measured way.

Receiving an Allegation

A member of staff who receives an allegation about a student from another member of staff, a student or a child, young person or adults at risk should follow the guidelines in Annexe 2 for dealing with disclosure.

The allegation should be reported immediately to the CEO or, in his absence, the Chair of the Board of Trustees. The CEO will:

Obtain written details of the allegation from the person who received it, check that are signed and dated. Where possible information about times, dates, locations and names of any potential witnesses should also be recorded. The written details should be countersigned and dated by a member of the Board of Trustees.

Initial Assessment by the CEO

The CEO will make an initial assessment of the allegation, consulting with the Chair of the Board of Trustees and the LSB as appropriate. Where the allegation is considered to be either a potential criminal act or indicates that the child, young person or adults at risk has suffered, is suffering or is likely to suffer significant harm, the matter should be reported immediately to the LSB. This is a 24 hour responsibility.

It is important that the CEO does not investigate the allegation. The initial assessment should be on the basis of the information received and is a decision about whether or not the allegation warrants further investigation.

Where the matter does not require reporting to the local LSB, other potential outcomes are:

  1. The matter can be addressed in accordance with the Student Disciplinary Regulations.
  2. The allegation can be shown to be false because the facts alleged could not possibly be true and no further action is required.

Enquiries and Investigations

Safeguarding enquiries by Social Services or the Police are not to be confused with internal, disciplinary enquiries by NAPA; however NAPA may be able to use the outcome of external agency enquiries as part of its own procedures. The statutory agencies, including the Police, have no power to direct NAPA to act in a particular way; however, NAPA must assist the agencies with their enquiries.

NAPA shall hold in abeyance its own internal enquiries while the formal police or social services investigations proceed; to do otherwise may prejudice the investigation. Any internal enquiries shall conform to the Student Disciplinary Regulations.

If there is an investigation by an external agency, for example the police, the finance and administration CEO would normally be involved in, and contribute to, the inter-agency strategy discussions. The CEO is responsible for ensuring that NAPA will provide every assistance with the agency’s enquiries. He will ensure that appropriate confidentiality is maintained in connection with the enquiries, in the interests of the student about whom the allegation is made. The CEO should advise the student that he/she should consult with a representative, for example, a parent or guardian or a legal representative.

Subject to objections from the police or other investigating agency, the CEO should:

  • Inform the person making the allegation that the investigation is taking place and what the likely process will involve.
  • Ensure that the parents/carers of a child or young person making an allegation have been informed that the allegation has been made and what the likely process will involve. In certain circumstances it may be appropriate to inform the recorded next of kin of a adults at risk making an allegation.
  • Inform the student against whom the allegation was made of the fact that the investigation is taking place and what the likely process will involve.
  • Inform the Chair of the Board of Trustees of the allegation and the investigation.

The CEO will keep a written record of the action taken in connection with the allegation and should consider any action under the Student Disciplinary Regulations which should be taken, pending the outcome of the full investigation, to safeguard both those who have made the allegation, any others who may potentially be at risk, and the student concerned.

Allegations without foundation

False allegations may be indicative of problems of abuse elsewhere. A record should be kept and consideration given to a referral to the LSB in order that other agencies may act upon the information.

Records

It is important that documents relating to an investigation are retained in a secure place, together with a written record of the outcome and, if disciplinary action is taken, details retained on the student’s personal and confidential file, in accordance with standard data protection procedures.

Monitoring Effectiveness

Where an allegation has been made against a student, the CEO should at the conclusion of the investigation and any disciplinary procedures, consider whether there are any matters arising from it that could lead to the improvement of the NAPA’s procedures and/or policies and/or which should be drawn to the attention of the LSB.

Annexe 4 Recruitment and Selection Procedures: Staff, Trustees, Students, Volunteers and Contractors

4.1 Recruitment and Selection Procedures (staff, trustees & volunteers)

NAPA has recruitment and selection procedures which are sensitive to the need for the NAPA to reduce the risk of harm to children, young people and adults at risk. These procedures take account of the following areas of good practice in relation to Safeguarding issues:

  • They apply to all staff who may work with children, young people and adults at risk.
  • They require documentary evidence of academic/vocational qualifications.
  • They contain the need to obtain professional and/or character references.
  • They will verify previous employment history.
  • All appropriate checks are carried out prior to confirmation of appointment Disclosure and Barring Service –enhanced DBS and a central list is held of all clearances, the dates carried out and when renewal is due. A failed DBS check will lead to termination of post whether paid or voluntary.
  • They use a variety of selection techniques (e.g. qualifications, previous experience, interview, reference checks).

4.2 Recruitment and Selection Procedures (students)

Overall NAPA works to satisfy itself that it is not recruiting students who will pose a risk to children, young people and adults at risk with whom they come into contact as part of their engagement with NAPA as a student. The Board of Trustees recognises that it has to rely on the honesty of students making applications to disclose any criminal convictions on their application. Any students found to have made a fraudulent declaration will be subject to NAPA’s Disciplinary procedures.

For certain, specified, professional programmes, such as the ISTD programme, students are required to have a DBS disclosure prior to them coming into contact with children, young people or adults at risk as part of their course.

Annexe 5      Guidelines for the Appointment of NAPA Contractors

In appointing Contractors to undertake work on behalf of NAPA on its premises, NAPA takes into account the need to reduce the risk of harm to children, young people and adults at risk. These guidelines take account of the following areas of good practice in relation to Safeguarding issues:

  • All contracted staff who work on NAPA premises are required at all times to carry proof of identity supplied and verified by NAPA which controls the areas of the premises they can enter.
  • All contracted staff who have access to “sensitive” areas, such as toilets and changing rooms, at a time when it is being used by students, then they will have been required to undertake a full DBS check through their employer and have their name placed on an “approved” NAPA list, or be accompanied at all times by an authorised member of NAPA staff (or designated and approved contractor)
  • Visitors & contractors should sign in and out of the premises on the central register held on reception.

Version (6) Children’s Safeguarding Board HULL Updated Sep 2017

Annexe 6 Notes for staff briefing session:

These notes will be given to staff to read as part of the induction process:

Introduction:

The purpose of this session is to outline NAPA’s policy in keeping students safe as well as complying with the law,.

The policy

  • highlights what responsibilities are enshrined in the law
  • helps you to understand your duties and obligations in the law
  • Provides detailed information on how you can protect and support children, young people and adults at risk.
  • assists you in protecting your reputation as well as that of NAPA the highlights your professional boundaries

Which organisations might be affected by this?

Who must develop a policy for protecting children, young people and adults at risk?

Every provider must have a policy as a legal, moral and ethical duty. These requirements are driven by a number of laws

The Child Protection Act
The Education Act
and from October 2009, the Safeguarding of Children and Adults at risk Act.

Additionally the report ‘Every Child Matters’ highlighted the need for coverage of ages up to age 19 years in safeguarding from harm and potential harm.

Why has this and other legislation been put in place?

The key act Safeguarding of Children and Adults at risk Act 2009 introduces a vetting, barring and safeguarding authority called the ISA (This was prompted by the two Soham murders in Cambridgeshire) This agency will ‘share’ information about individuals and their level of ‘safety’. It is hoped that this centralisation of information where lists are kept of those people unable to work with children and young adults. The ISA is based in Doncaster. Lists will soon be held on those needing what are now DBS checks fore those who have regular, personal contacts with children, young people and adults at risk.

Employers must, as a legal requirement, report on those people who might be banned or need to be banned as a result of being found to have acted inappropriately or criminally. It is therefore very important to ensure that students are listened to and taken seriously in their allegations so as to ensure that as yet unknown paedophiles cannot exploit teaching posts or indeed opportunities at NAPA to ‘groom’ victims.

What does NAPA’s policy contain?

  • How to respond to a disclosure if a student confides in you;

    What will happen when NAPA is recruiting and selecting staff and anyone who has contact with our students; (We must ask them if they have had a relevant criminal conviction: i.e. significant violence, use and sale of drugs)

    What visitors and / or contractors must do – such as having a contractor ID with an expiry date which also highlights which part of the premises they cannot enter without being accompanied.

    Overall what NAPA does to ensure a safe and secure environment which is protected from harm.

Who?

Definitions are provided which recognise that the law covers all children and young people up to 18 years old in England or under 16 years in Scotland.

Adults at risk include people with a substantial learning or physical disability, physical or mental illness or mental disorder which produces a significant reduction in physical or mental capacity (chronic or otherwise)

What is ‘harm’?

Physical abuse
Neglect
Sexual abuse
Emotional abuse (e.g: bullying)
Financial abuse (such as withholding benefit etc)

Managing disclosure

Listen carefully
Do not make judgements
Do not interview or question
Tell the student that you must pass the information on to NAPA’s designated officer who is Carl Wheatley
Do not promise confidentiality
Reassure and try to make the student feel safe
Keep accurate notes on times date of occurrence
Pass your concerns on immediately

What happens next

NAPA has a legal duty to have a 24 hour service for those under 18 years old.
The policy outlines the channels of referral which might include the Police and Social Services;

Following a report

The CEO will review if there is a need to evoke the Safeguarding Policy and involve external agencies (such as Social Services, and/or the Police) Will keep records

Will inform relevant parties including the student concerned, follow the Safeguarding Policy and be guided by external agencies; Report to the Chair of the Board of Trustees as matter of urgency

Will advise if the safeguarding policy is not relevant and what alternative action can be taken. The student or staff member may be excluded from NAPA whilst an enquiry is run by or when a police or social services inquiry is underway.

Meanwhile as a professional you are expected to maintain complete confidentiality about your report and only take further action if requested by BD.

Knowing your Professional Boundaries

Do not take risks – professional or personal.
Our relationship with students is a professional one at all times.

Examples: lending or giving money

Providing lifts in cars (an issue of both insurance cover as well as potential for ‘inappropriate contact’)

Field trips and other events whereby you are alone for long periods of time without the parents consent or when rumour could be triggered.

Having unnecessary physical contacts (sometimes this might be difficult) Dance often requires the teacher to physically guide a movement or help with corrections by physical contact. Without the guidance the student may not gain the correct posture, understanding or technical requirements.

Having personal relationships with students

Avoid sharing personal details such as your mobile phone number/home address or other personal detail. Texting individual students should be avoided except in urgent situations, when the text should also be copied to the CEO.

Key issues which would be scrutinised in an investigation would be If there has been a level of unnecessary secrecy, such as hiding information from other people, the presence of manipulative behaviours such as saying things like: “don’t tell anyone we’ve done this..” All of these will raise concerns.

It’s not always about what you can’t do, but more about being aware and thinking about what you are doing and how, (worse case) it would be judged by others.

Updated Nov 2017 by Hull Children Safeguarding Board & Carl Wheatley (CEO NAPA) 2019